Book of the dead book review

book of the dead book review

Mai Bloodbound - Book Of The Dead. Review. Galerie mit 14 Bildern: Bloodbound - Bang Your Head!!! - Warm-Up Show. 1. März [Rezension zu] J. Borghouts, Book of the Dead 39, From shouting to Structure: Wiesbaden, Lüscher Article Subtype: Book Review. A review, and links to other information about and reviews of The Dead the book is structured more by its images and digressions than by its.

It would be over the top and off-brand and completely unnecessary. So, that gets us back to 4 stars. Preston and Child have in store for our heroes going forward.

View all 31 comments. I normally never buy NY Times bestsellers, as it's usually the morons of America that cause the shittiest books ever written to end up on this list.

The Book of the Dead was an exception I made. I just finished this book and I'm still reeling. It's full of complex, well-developed characters, it has an evil genius part Hannibal Lecter, part Sideshow Bob conspiring to ruin lives, a cooped-up myst I normally never buy NY Times bestsellers, as it's usually the morons of America that cause the shittiest books ever written to end up on this list.

The writers are too smart for you, and they stay 10 steps ahead at all times. The evil genius isn't just bad, he's a meniachal nut-case that you almost have to admire for his psychotic brilliance.

His brother, the equally brilliant FBI agent, gets his ass kicked just enough to make him believable, but not a wussy.

They give away nothing about the other books, so I can go back to number one and start reading without knowing what happened. When a book is just a story, I get driven nuts.

Good authors, like these ones, include other shit in their books because they're SMART and they know how to keep a reader interested. This book will have you googling shit, looking for places on maps, trying to find out more information about historical figures, downloading classical musicians you'd never ever heard of, and checking up on Oscar Wilde quotes, etc.

THIS, to me, is what makes a novel great: Uhhh, two words for you: Here are some more: I can keep this up all day.

View all 9 comments. This was so good! You would need to go to book 5 Brimstone to start the book trio between the Pendergast brothers.

Aloysius is an FBI agent and reminds me of Sherlock. Extremely intelligent, calm and resourceful. Minus the whole cocaine habit.

Diogenes is his brilliant, psychotic brother and This was so good! Diogenes is his brilliant, psychotic brother and he makes me think of Moriarty.

Yeah you're right, they have some weird parents and relatives to give them those names!! They are both intelligent, brilliant and 5 steps ahead of us stupid people.

Back to the 7th book in the series and the 3rd book in the Diogenes series. Just start at Relic 1st book in the series and read the books in consecutive order.

I guess I am laying all the groundwork in this review so you do not start with this book. This is not a stand alone!

This book involves Egyptian curses, the prison system and love that turns into revenge and hate! Really, that's all that I can say about the plot without ruining book 5 Brimstone and 6 Dance of Death.

If you want action, suspense along with some creepy factors in a series, go read this series. Each book has a great plot, excellent technical and science details along with memorable characters.

View all 5 comments. I am marking this 5 stars, but it is more like 4. I hate to take any stars from Preston and Child, but, while the book was great, I did not care for the climax very much.

The story was an action packed resolution to the Diogenes trilogy in the same vein as the other Pendergast novels that I have come to know and love.

I think where the book and the climax lost me as it almost felt rushed to resolve both the book and the trilogy. But, even with my minor complaints, this series continues to be awesome, I still highly recommend it, and I cannot wait for the next one!

Jul 13, Emma rated it liked it. Usually I really enjoy these novels so I was disappointed that I didn't enjoy this as much.

I didn't think the Event that caused so much hatred between the two brothers was that impressive in terms of the lengths Diogenes went to to destroy his brother.

This was definitely the poorest of the Diogenes trilogy. The next in series is also not popular with fans of the series as it is in a different setting and without the supporting cast so I may give that one a miss.

A tepid contribution to the serie Usually I really enjoy these novels so I was disappointed that I didn't enjoy this as much.

A tepid contribution to the series. I really hope it picks up again. Great conclusion to the Diogenes Trilogy within the Pendergast series!

Nothing like a bombshell ending to make you immediately want to pick up the next book. Oct 03, J. Grice rated it really liked it Shelves: Another excellent thriller featuring Agent Pendergast.

The last of the hair-raising Diogenes trilogy within the Pendergast series. I loved this trilogy. This last one was really a nail-biter and gave me goosebumps.

Prepare for several travesties where you are constantly asking yourself what is really going on and wondering if the characters can recover. Resilience can be found in the strangest of places.

If you push a person too far, you just might find out wha The last of the hair-raising Diogenes trilogy within the Pendergast series.

If you push a person too far, you just might find out what they are made of. Oct 01, Karl Marberger rated it really liked it Shelves: Lots of action and good dialogue.

Great to see the whole ensemble of recurring characters interact. Might write a review of sorts for the Pendergast-Diogenes trilogy later.

I thoroughly enjoyed this, although I find myself having to suspend my disbelief at times, and wishing that the resolution at the end panned out differently.

Highly readable, thrilling, and pretty darn hard to put down - I'm sure the rate I've been finishing up these books was a positive sign.

Suspense and mystery lovers. One dreary December evening some years ago, I slogged in to my local Fred Meyer, stamping snow off my shoes, and encountered a tall, friendly, dapper gentlemen hawking paperback books near the door.

He introduced himself as Douglas Preston and said the book, Relic , was being made into a movie. I thought, Yeah, sure. So why are you standing here in a deserted grocery store in Kennewick, Washington, on a night like this?

I sort of felt sorry for the guy, so I bought the book. About 24 hours later, One dreary December evening some years ago, I slogged in to my local Fred Meyer, stamping snow off my shoes, and encountered a tall, friendly, dapper gentlemen hawking paperback books near the door.

About 24 hours later, completely wrung out, I finished the book, wondering why I had so enjoyed being scared out of my mind. I decided that next time this pair published a book, I would get on the roller-coaster and take another ride.

This one was a doozy! Reread in October great choice for the Halloween season! Five years was long enough for me to forget much of he plot and, therefore, be able to appreciate the suspense in The Book of the Dead.

Also, having read several books in the Pendergast series lately, I was more engaged in sharing the adventures with characters I know.

Jun 17, Chris rated it it was amazing. Forget James Patterson, folks, these guys know what they're doing and do it better than pretty much anyone.

Thorough, well-researched storylines, but not the type i. Da Vinci Code that bogs down the thrust of the storytelling.

Oh yeah, and most of their novels feature one of the most compelling protagonists in modern fiction Many of their books feature Pendergast as well as a host of recurring characters, and a few are stand-alones, but to make it simple, start with Relic and no, if you've seen the awful Pendergast-less movie, there is NO comparison , and its sequel, Reliquary, and go on to Cabinet of Curiosities, Still Life with Crows, and on to what is referred to as "The Diogenes trilogy", which is Brimstone, Dance of Death, and The Book of the Dead.

Which is where this review begins. Needless to say, for those not drawn into the fold, as it were, I will try to keep spoilers to a minimum so don't read on any further.

The novel completes the Diogenes Trilogy, which pits Pendergast against his diabolical younger brother, Diogenes, who--in the previous novel--concocted an elaborate scheme to eventually send his brother to prison, for a crime he didn't commit.

But this was only the tip of the iceberg. Diogenes has a much larger, deadlier plan. The museum's hierarchy decide to best way to circumvent the "bad press" and public outcry is to reopen a revitalized century-old Egyptian exhibit, The Tomb of Senef.

Of course, in the process of doing so, mysterious and gruesome murders occur, causing some to think the Grand Reopening of the Tomb should be postponed, but of course the show must go on!

As Diogenes's plan unfolds, which entails secretive visits to Pendergasts' young ward from The Cabinet of Curiousities, Constance Greene, in order to seduce her with his version of the truth, Pendergast manages to escape prison in an attempt to thwart Diogenes's Coup de Grace at the museum's Grand Reopening of the Tomb.

This might seem like a LOT going on and it is, but the authors deftly and smartly interweave the plot and subplots in such a way to make it seamless.

The stunning climax is fitting, and the surprise at the end will leave readers wanting to pick up the next novel, The Wheel of Darkness.

View all 6 comments. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.

The Book of the Dead is the last of three in the Agent Pendergast series. I'm not sure why it's a trilogy, though, because there are actually six or 7 books with that character and they're all somehow related.

Dance of Death and this book focus on the hatred and battle between the Pendergast brothers, FBI Special Agent Aloysius and his brilliant but murderously pathological brother Diogenes.

The previous book left off with Diogenes framing his brother for some horrific crimes and then stealing m The Book of the Dead is the last of three in the Agent Pendergast series.

The previous book left off with Diogenes framing his brother for some horrific crimes and then stealing millions of dollars worth of diamonds from the Museum of History.

Aloysius goes to prison and Diogenes drops out of sight These two books reunite some old favorite characters from early stories.

Of the Pendergast trilogy, I was most disappointed in this book. I know I'm in the minority because most people really enjoyed the series and I wondered if I missed the boat somehow.

The first part of the book was too slow for me. There was too much time spent on trying to break Pendergast in prison and police captain Laura Hayward being too proud to listen to Detective D'Agosta.

One thing is for sure: Two murders occurred before the opening of the Tomb of Senef I guess those monkeys never learn.

There was a character that turned me off and why was his last scene with the warden necessary? The man should have been deposited in a prison himself, not deported to another FBI office!

Everyone of the books has had the prerequisite Ass in Charge. A plotline that was a total turn off but ended out well: Diogenes seducing Constance Green.

I guess it was predictable but it was done too easily. What came later was awesome! The second part of the book was a lot more interesting and the only reason I gave the book 3 stars.

At that point, Pendergast has been broken out of one of those "no one can escape from here prisons" and reunited with his old crime fighting buddy Vincent D'Agosta.

Laura Hayward's come to her senses and realizes she needs to unite with D'Agosta and Pendergast to save all those unfortunates in the Tomb of Senef Best of all was the sudden change in Constance Greene.

Her pursuit and battle with Diogenes scenes were the best I've read in a long time. I felt cheated by "The Event". I absolutely can see one brother goading another into trouble, I just can't see that particular outcome.

Diogenes supposedly suffered brain damage in the ventromedial frontal cortex from the incident, which involved lights and sound.

For revenge, he wanted to induce it in millions of people. His first two victims had total psychotic breaks and became violent. They were beyond reason and so I wondered how Diogenes was able to think at all or be around people--years of self control?

I couldn't find any information on the so-called "Higginbottom region" but maybe it's out there somewhere. I know there's at least one more book now, one that focuses more on Constance Green.

I haven't decided whether I want to read it or not. I've been alternately exasperated, bored, and enthralled with the story so far I tend to enjoy books in a series more and more when I've developed a "relationship" with the characters.

This may not be the best written book in the series, but it feels like it to me because it is so true to the characters.

Raise your hand if you really think a detective can be as near-omniscient as Sherlock Holmes. Now, that being said, if you still enjoy suspending your disbelief enough to enjoy the improbable mastery of minutiae that Arthur Conan Doyle as Warning: Now, that being said, if you still enjoy suspending your disbelief enough to enjoy the improbable mastery of minutiae that Arthur Conan Doyle ascribed to Holmes, you would probably enjoy the Pendergast novels of Lincoln Child and Douglas Preston.

Some of the dust jackets of the hardbound versions of these novels compare Special F. Agent Pendergast and the Consulting Detective known as Holmes.

And how about all of those wonderful disguises used by both Aloysius and Diogenes Pendergast?! Frankly, if I had to believe the martial arts prowess demonstrated in one scene combined with the improbable escape in another, I would have exiled Child and Preston from the Wilsonian Library long ago.

Although they are clearly set in the latter part of the 20th century or first part of this century, they have atmospherics redolent of medieval Italy, antebellum U.

Child and Preston have an amazing ability to intertwine history and mystery within a modern conundrum. Not content with locked room mysteries, they insist on locked museum and locked prison mysteries, in spite of high-tech surveillance equipment and fail-safe procedures.

Ancient artifacts and legends are juxtaposed against surprisingly modern technologies and methodologies. Most amazing to me in this novel was an introspective journey taken by Agent Pendergast at a critical point in the plot.

For the purposes of the novel, it was an amazing way to handle exposition of the plot without resorting to a hokey dialogue.

It was as suspenseful as many of the action scenes. There is a marvelous interplay between loyalty and betrayal played off between the various ongoing relationships we have seen developing in the course of the series, as well as the new one developing in this book.

It may well be because of my interesting in the Ancient Near East in general and in Egyptology in specific that I found this book more satisfying than usual, but I think this may have been the best yet.

Aug 09, JoJo rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Recommended to JoJo by: Although all three books can be read without the other, if you read the last one first like i did, it ruins earlier books because you find out stuff ahead, like reading the last chapter of a book first.

Aug 10, C-shaw rated it it was amazing. Their writing is crisp and action-packed, with short chapters that can be read in a hurry.

One of the things I enjoy about a book is to come across words with which I am not familiar, in which case I usually look up the definition and write it in the book margin, thus hopefully improving my vocabulary.

This book is No. You never fail to steer me to good reads, Matthew. I neglected everything and read pages in two days.

I feel like all my reviews for the Pendergast series are starting to sound the same, I'm gushing as if in love about how fantastic the books are but its still true, this story is phenomenal and it makes you want to read another and another, this could easily have thirty volumes and I would still want to read them all, as usual this book reads smooth as silk while the action cuts like a knife.

The Book of The Dead is the standard great stuff that one would expect from the insightful and intelligen I feel like all my reviews for the Pendergast series are starting to sound the same, I'm gushing as if in love about how fantastic the books are but its still true, this story is phenomenal and it makes you want to read another and another, this could easily have thirty volumes and I would still want to read them all, as usual this book reads smooth as silk while the action cuts like a knife.

The Book of The Dead is the standard great stuff that one would expect from the insightful and intelligent duo, their stories breathe a life of their own and to me they feel different than other novels.

Our world is filled with books, one can find them everywhere but whenever I read a Pendergast novel I feel as if I was holding something of heft and value, there is knowledge in these pages; ancient cultures, science, architecture, folklore and mysticism, curses, artifacts and it all sounds real enough to touch and some of it is but I especially adore all the breathtaking characters both good and bad and some in-between, in my opinion they are invaluable to the books.

I guess they speak to me, true love haha Pendergast lives in my mind beyond the pages of the book, that's how great he is. The third in the Diogenes Pendergast trilogy and seventh in the Aloysius Pendergast series I highly recommend starting with Relic, Pendergast 1 story continues on the wild hunt to catch and expose the elusive Diogenes who is conveniently presumed to be dead by everyone but the small circle of our heroes.

The Queen of Narnia, The Heart of Eternity, The Indigo Ghost, Ultima Thule, The Fourth of July, The Zanzibar Green and of course Lucifer's Heart, all precious diamonds that were stole in the last installment are destroyed by Diogenes and arrive pulverized into a rainbow colored snow to the museum as a final act of madness and show of power.

The previous book was simply fantastic and it exposed Diogenes' identity but only to the reader, the entire museum still has no idea that not only is Diogenes alive but his secret identity is walking right under their noses.

To make matters worse, Aloysius Pendergast is in a top security prison and everyone that has always been jealous of him is gunning for the guy to go down, he deals with that brilliantly, boy that was fun!

Even though Aloysius is locked up he is the only one who can match up against his evil and twisted genius of a brother, their journey takes them half way through the globe and back.

My personal favorite part of the tale was the prison sequence, well pretty much all of it, I don't want to spoil anything but what happens to Pendergast in the prison is nuts.

I read all the parts while holding my breath, some I had to re-read because they were simply too good to only read once. Ingenious and stunning, no deus-ex machina way out of this puppy!

Lots of stuff happens, there is also the museum exhibit with a tomb that appears to be cursed, madness and mayhem breaks out as usual, lovers of museum thrillers will have a ball with the Tomb of Senef and those who love Pendergast will gobble up everything he does and says.

I was finally impressed with Constance, I never really gave her much thought before but through this book she became another strong contender for future stories and my dear Vincent D'Agosta, he was wonderful as was Laura Hayward.

For some reason Laura Linney the actress kept popping into my head when Hayward's scenes came up, she was something, the woman can hold her own.

This was such a tremendous journey with the two brothers that I'm not sad to see it over because I'm really looking forward to the next chapter, the next book sounds quite potent and meaty and I might need a bit of a break to let my brain prepare for another greatness of Preston and Child.

I don't read them back to back on purpose as much as I really want to, after all it's not good to eat dessert three times a day, same with books, I save the good stuff to be savored when I'm really in the mood for greatness.

Jun 03, Mike Moore rated it it was ok. Remember those old movies that blended cartoons and live action? This book reminded me of those, perhaps more the latter than the former.

The book starts with promise, presenting some compelling scenes and introducing some believable characters. Than we're introduced to the villain and the hero, two ridiculous cartoons striding through a world of normals.

The plot quickly spins out of the realm of the remotely plausible, as the cartoons seem to infect Remember those old movies that blended cartoons and live action?

The plot quickly spins out of the realm of the remotely plausible, as the cartoons seem to infect those around them, transforming the hapless humans into wacky, goofy caricatures that can then careen wildly through what's left of my credulity.

Any attempt to prevent spoilers ends here. I'm actually not that hard a case for this kind of thing. I'm generally happy to suspend disbelief and accept the world that the author wants to present, as long as its consistent and fulfills its objective in this case, pure entertainment.

So, even though I couldn't read the scenes with Diogenes Pendergast without seeing a wild eyed animated Christopher Lloyd in my mind, I was enjoying the book enough for a generally favorable three stars review.

There were two things that lost me though. First, I really want characters to have legitimate motivation.

In this book, Diogenes is motivated to spend about a billion dollars, wantonly destroy half a million more in diamonds, dedicate about 15 years of his life to performing about man-years of work in a variety of disciplines that are not remotely related yeah okay, he's a cartoon, whatever , and kill dozens of people because You know, there was this thing that happened to him when he was a kid, and it just made him That's beyond what I can will away by suspension of disbelief.

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Book of the dead book review -

Die Instrumentalfraktion hat jedoch ganze Arbeit geleistet. Und dennoch unterscheidet sich "Leichenblässe" in einem wesentlichen Punkt von den restlichen Büchern der Reihe. We Are The City: I guessed the killer early on, which although wasn't confirmed until the reveal, took some of the suspense out of it; I remember actually gasping at the reveals in the previous books. Benachrichtige mich per Mail bei weiteren Kommentaren zu diesem Album. Auf der Suche nach neuer Mucke?

The last of the hair-raising Diogenes trilogy within the Pendergast series. I loved this trilogy. This last one was really a nail-biter and gave me goosebumps.

Prepare for several travesties where you are constantly asking yourself what is really going on and wondering if the characters can recover.

Resilience can be found in the strangest of places. If you push a person too far, you just might find out wha The last of the hair-raising Diogenes trilogy within the Pendergast series.

If you push a person too far, you just might find out what they are made of. Oct 01, Karl Marberger rated it really liked it Shelves: Lots of action and good dialogue.

Great to see the whole ensemble of recurring characters interact. Might write a review of sorts for the Pendergast-Diogenes trilogy later.

I thoroughly enjoyed this, although I find myself having to suspend my disbelief at times, and wishing that the resolution at the end panned out differently.

Highly readable, thrilling, and pretty darn hard to put down - I'm sure the rate I've been finishing up these books was a positive sign.

Suspense and mystery lovers. One dreary December evening some years ago, I slogged in to my local Fred Meyer, stamping snow off my shoes, and encountered a tall, friendly, dapper gentlemen hawking paperback books near the door.

He introduced himself as Douglas Preston and said the book, Relic , was being made into a movie. I thought, Yeah, sure.

So why are you standing here in a deserted grocery store in Kennewick, Washington, on a night like this? I sort of felt sorry for the guy, so I bought the book.

About 24 hours later, One dreary December evening some years ago, I slogged in to my local Fred Meyer, stamping snow off my shoes, and encountered a tall, friendly, dapper gentlemen hawking paperback books near the door.

About 24 hours later, completely wrung out, I finished the book, wondering why I had so enjoyed being scared out of my mind.

I decided that next time this pair published a book, I would get on the roller-coaster and take another ride. This one was a doozy!

Reread in October great choice for the Halloween season! Five years was long enough for me to forget much of he plot and, therefore, be able to appreciate the suspense in The Book of the Dead.

Also, having read several books in the Pendergast series lately, I was more engaged in sharing the adventures with characters I know.

Jun 17, Chris rated it it was amazing. Forget James Patterson, folks, these guys know what they're doing and do it better than pretty much anyone.

Thorough, well-researched storylines, but not the type i. Da Vinci Code that bogs down the thrust of the storytelling. Oh yeah, and most of their novels feature one of the most compelling protagonists in modern fiction Many of their books feature Pendergast as well as a host of recurring characters, and a few are stand-alones, but to make it simple, start with Relic and no, if you've seen the awful Pendergast-less movie, there is NO comparison , and its sequel, Reliquary, and go on to Cabinet of Curiosities, Still Life with Crows, and on to what is referred to as "The Diogenes trilogy", which is Brimstone, Dance of Death, and The Book of the Dead.

Which is where this review begins. Needless to say, for those not drawn into the fold, as it were, I will try to keep spoilers to a minimum so don't read on any further.

The novel completes the Diogenes Trilogy, which pits Pendergast against his diabolical younger brother, Diogenes, who--in the previous novel--concocted an elaborate scheme to eventually send his brother to prison, for a crime he didn't commit.

But this was only the tip of the iceberg. Diogenes has a much larger, deadlier plan. The museum's hierarchy decide to best way to circumvent the "bad press" and public outcry is to reopen a revitalized century-old Egyptian exhibit, The Tomb of Senef.

Of course, in the process of doing so, mysterious and gruesome murders occur, causing some to think the Grand Reopening of the Tomb should be postponed, but of course the show must go on!

As Diogenes's plan unfolds, which entails secretive visits to Pendergasts' young ward from The Cabinet of Curiousities, Constance Greene, in order to seduce her with his version of the truth, Pendergast manages to escape prison in an attempt to thwart Diogenes's Coup de Grace at the museum's Grand Reopening of the Tomb.

This might seem like a LOT going on and it is, but the authors deftly and smartly interweave the plot and subplots in such a way to make it seamless.

The stunning climax is fitting, and the surprise at the end will leave readers wanting to pick up the next novel, The Wheel of Darkness. View all 6 comments.

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The Book of the Dead is the last of three in the Agent Pendergast series.

I'm not sure why it's a trilogy, though, because there are actually six or 7 books with that character and they're all somehow related.

Dance of Death and this book focus on the hatred and battle between the Pendergast brothers, FBI Special Agent Aloysius and his brilliant but murderously pathological brother Diogenes.

The previous book left off with Diogenes framing his brother for some horrific crimes and then stealing m The Book of the Dead is the last of three in the Agent Pendergast series.

The previous book left off with Diogenes framing his brother for some horrific crimes and then stealing millions of dollars worth of diamonds from the Museum of History.

Aloysius goes to prison and Diogenes drops out of sight These two books reunite some old favorite characters from early stories.

Of the Pendergast trilogy, I was most disappointed in this book. I know I'm in the minority because most people really enjoyed the series and I wondered if I missed the boat somehow.

The first part of the book was too slow for me. There was too much time spent on trying to break Pendergast in prison and police captain Laura Hayward being too proud to listen to Detective D'Agosta.

One thing is for sure: Two murders occurred before the opening of the Tomb of Senef I guess those monkeys never learn. There was a character that turned me off and why was his last scene with the warden necessary?

The man should have been deposited in a prison himself, not deported to another FBI office! Everyone of the books has had the prerequisite Ass in Charge.

A plotline that was a total turn off but ended out well: Diogenes seducing Constance Green. I guess it was predictable but it was done too easily.

What came later was awesome! The second part of the book was a lot more interesting and the only reason I gave the book 3 stars.

At that point, Pendergast has been broken out of one of those "no one can escape from here prisons" and reunited with his old crime fighting buddy Vincent D'Agosta.

Laura Hayward's come to her senses and realizes she needs to unite with D'Agosta and Pendergast to save all those unfortunates in the Tomb of Senef Best of all was the sudden change in Constance Greene.

Her pursuit and battle with Diogenes scenes were the best I've read in a long time. I felt cheated by "The Event".

I absolutely can see one brother goading another into trouble, I just can't see that particular outcome. Diogenes supposedly suffered brain damage in the ventromedial frontal cortex from the incident, which involved lights and sound.

For revenge, he wanted to induce it in millions of people. His first two victims had total psychotic breaks and became violent.

They were beyond reason and so I wondered how Diogenes was able to think at all or be around people--years of self control? I couldn't find any information on the so-called "Higginbottom region" but maybe it's out there somewhere.

I know there's at least one more book now, one that focuses more on Constance Green. I haven't decided whether I want to read it or not.

I've been alternately exasperated, bored, and enthralled with the story so far I tend to enjoy books in a series more and more when I've developed a "relationship" with the characters.

This may not be the best written book in the series, but it feels like it to me because it is so true to the characters.

Raise your hand if you really think a detective can be as near-omniscient as Sherlock Holmes. Now, that being said, if you still enjoy suspending your disbelief enough to enjoy the improbable mastery of minutiae that Arthur Conan Doyle as Warning: Now, that being said, if you still enjoy suspending your disbelief enough to enjoy the improbable mastery of minutiae that Arthur Conan Doyle ascribed to Holmes, you would probably enjoy the Pendergast novels of Lincoln Child and Douglas Preston.

Some of the dust jackets of the hardbound versions of these novels compare Special F. Agent Pendergast and the Consulting Detective known as Holmes.

And how about all of those wonderful disguises used by both Aloysius and Diogenes Pendergast?! Frankly, if I had to believe the martial arts prowess demonstrated in one scene combined with the improbable escape in another, I would have exiled Child and Preston from the Wilsonian Library long ago.

Although they are clearly set in the latter part of the 20th century or first part of this century, they have atmospherics redolent of medieval Italy, antebellum U.

Child and Preston have an amazing ability to intertwine history and mystery within a modern conundrum. Not content with locked room mysteries, they insist on locked museum and locked prison mysteries, in spite of high-tech surveillance equipment and fail-safe procedures.

Ancient artifacts and legends are juxtaposed against surprisingly modern technologies and methodologies. Most amazing to me in this novel was an introspective journey taken by Agent Pendergast at a critical point in the plot.

For the purposes of the novel, it was an amazing way to handle exposition of the plot without resorting to a hokey dialogue. It was as suspenseful as many of the action scenes.

There is a marvelous interplay between loyalty and betrayal played off between the various ongoing relationships we have seen developing in the course of the series, as well as the new one developing in this book.

It may well be because of my interesting in the Ancient Near East in general and in Egyptology in specific that I found this book more satisfying than usual, but I think this may have been the best yet.

Aug 09, JoJo rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Recommended to JoJo by: Although all three books can be read without the other, if you read the last one first like i did, it ruins earlier books because you find out stuff ahead, like reading the last chapter of a book first.

Aug 10, C-shaw rated it it was amazing. Their writing is crisp and action-packed, with short chapters that can be read in a hurry.

One of the things I enjoy about a book is to come across words with which I am not familiar, in which case I usually look up the definition and write it in the book margin, thus hopefully improving my vocabulary.

This book is No. You never fail to steer me to good reads, Matthew. I neglected everything and read pages in two days. I feel like all my reviews for the Pendergast series are starting to sound the same, I'm gushing as if in love about how fantastic the books are but its still true, this story is phenomenal and it makes you want to read another and another, this could easily have thirty volumes and I would still want to read them all, as usual this book reads smooth as silk while the action cuts like a knife.

The Book of The Dead is the standard great stuff that one would expect from the insightful and intelligen I feel like all my reviews for the Pendergast series are starting to sound the same, I'm gushing as if in love about how fantastic the books are but its still true, this story is phenomenal and it makes you want to read another and another, this could easily have thirty volumes and I would still want to read them all, as usual this book reads smooth as silk while the action cuts like a knife.

The Book of The Dead is the standard great stuff that one would expect from the insightful and intelligent duo, their stories breathe a life of their own and to me they feel different than other novels.

Our world is filled with books, one can find them everywhere but whenever I read a Pendergast novel I feel as if I was holding something of heft and value, there is knowledge in these pages; ancient cultures, science, architecture, folklore and mysticism, curses, artifacts and it all sounds real enough to touch and some of it is but I especially adore all the breathtaking characters both good and bad and some in-between, in my opinion they are invaluable to the books.

I guess they speak to me, true love haha Pendergast lives in my mind beyond the pages of the book, that's how great he is.

The third in the Diogenes Pendergast trilogy and seventh in the Aloysius Pendergast series I highly recommend starting with Relic, Pendergast 1 story continues on the wild hunt to catch and expose the elusive Diogenes who is conveniently presumed to be dead by everyone but the small circle of our heroes.

The Queen of Narnia, The Heart of Eternity, The Indigo Ghost, Ultima Thule, The Fourth of July, The Zanzibar Green and of course Lucifer's Heart, all precious diamonds that were stole in the last installment are destroyed by Diogenes and arrive pulverized into a rainbow colored snow to the museum as a final act of madness and show of power.

The previous book was simply fantastic and it exposed Diogenes' identity but only to the reader, the entire museum still has no idea that not only is Diogenes alive but his secret identity is walking right under their noses.

To make matters worse, Aloysius Pendergast is in a top security prison and everyone that has always been jealous of him is gunning for the guy to go down, he deals with that brilliantly, boy that was fun!

Even though Aloysius is locked up he is the only one who can match up against his evil and twisted genius of a brother, their journey takes them half way through the globe and back.

My personal favorite part of the tale was the prison sequence, well pretty much all of it, I don't want to spoil anything but what happens to Pendergast in the prison is nuts.

I read all the parts while holding my breath, some I had to re-read because they were simply too good to only read once.

Ingenious and stunning, no deus-ex machina way out of this puppy! Lots of stuff happens, there is also the museum exhibit with a tomb that appears to be cursed, madness and mayhem breaks out as usual, lovers of museum thrillers will have a ball with the Tomb of Senef and those who love Pendergast will gobble up everything he does and says.

I was finally impressed with Constance, I never really gave her much thought before but through this book she became another strong contender for future stories and my dear Vincent D'Agosta, he was wonderful as was Laura Hayward.

For some reason Laura Linney the actress kept popping into my head when Hayward's scenes came up, she was something, the woman can hold her own.

This was such a tremendous journey with the two brothers that I'm not sad to see it over because I'm really looking forward to the next chapter, the next book sounds quite potent and meaty and I might need a bit of a break to let my brain prepare for another greatness of Preston and Child.

I don't read them back to back on purpose as much as I really want to, after all it's not good to eat dessert three times a day, same with books, I save the good stuff to be savored when I'm really in the mood for greatness.

Jun 03, Mike Moore rated it it was ok. Remember those old movies that blended cartoons and live action?

This book reminded me of those, perhaps more the latter than the former. The book starts with promise, presenting some compelling scenes and introducing some believable characters.

Than we're introduced to the villain and the hero, two ridiculous cartoons striding through a world of normals.

The plot quickly spins out of the realm of the remotely plausible, as the cartoons seem to infect Remember those old movies that blended cartoons and live action?

The plot quickly spins out of the realm of the remotely plausible, as the cartoons seem to infect those around them, transforming the hapless humans into wacky, goofy caricatures that can then careen wildly through what's left of my credulity.

Any attempt to prevent spoilers ends here. I'm actually not that hard a case for this kind of thing.

I'm generally happy to suspend disbelief and accept the world that the author wants to present, as long as its consistent and fulfills its objective in this case, pure entertainment.

So, even though I couldn't read the scenes with Diogenes Pendergast without seeing a wild eyed animated Christopher Lloyd in my mind, I was enjoying the book enough for a generally favorable three stars review.

There were two things that lost me though. First, I really want characters to have legitimate motivation. In this book, Diogenes is motivated to spend about a billion dollars, wantonly destroy half a million more in diamonds, dedicate about 15 years of his life to performing about man-years of work in a variety of disciplines that are not remotely related yeah okay, he's a cartoon, whatever , and kill dozens of people because You know, there was this thing that happened to him when he was a kid, and it just made him That's beyond what I can will away by suspension of disbelief.

Why is she there? Why should we care about her? And why does Diogenes risk his whole plan to sneak into her room and seduce her?

Okay fine, he's crazy like that he doesn't need a reason, but these are still the most ridiculous and seemingly pointless scenes of the whole book, and that's really saying something.

Well, it turns out that the reason for it all is so that Constance can come from out of nowhere in the end of the book and kill Diogenes by wrestling him into a live volcano.

She has to do it, because the main character can't bring himself to. She falls in as well. I'm pretty sure the volcano has some ominous name, like Mount Doom or the Gate of Hell or something.

So we have pages and pages of painful scenes that have the sole purpose of manufacturing Golumn so that she can jump into a volcano.

It's transparent in retrospect, because there was no other possible reason for those scenes to exist. That's beyond sloppy storytelling.

View all 4 comments. I picked this book up from my local library for a dollar. I believe it was a dollar well spent.

The creepy factor was right up there. I like how the authors used modern day techniques to achieve horrific situations.

This was definitely a thrill ride and I enjoyed my time on it. Feb 05, Paul rated it it was ok Shelves: I enjoyed Douglas Preston's recent best-selling sci-fi thriller, Impact also reviewed here on Facebook , but did not much like this one, a bit of airport trash he co-wrote with Lincoln Child.

It's not as bad as Ted Bell's Spy reviewed here: The Book of the Dead is one of a series of novels, with a cast of characters introduced and presumably more fully developed in earlier novels.

Unfortunately, though I enjoyed Douglas Preston's recent best-selling sci-fi thriller, Impact also reviewed here on Facebook , but did not much like this one, a bit of airport trash he co-wrote with Lincoln Child.

Unfortunately, though I think the authors intended it to be, it is anything but a stand-alone novel. Odd and peripheral characters are constantly being introduced with no explanation of what may have gone before -- two separate female characters had apparently been attacked and almost murdered in previous novels; another seems to a scientific and philosophical experiment, a year-old savant in the body of a woman in her 20s, with the social skills and worldly experience of a home-schooled year-old -- and you never quite grasp who these people are or why they are important.

The main characters, two brothers, are well explained, though improbable -- one is an evil genius, the other a good genius, each gifted with essentially superhuman powers.

And there's a female police captain, who is always referred to by her title, which is Captain of Homicide -- a most un-American kind of title, although she's NYPD.

In parts of the book it is all too clear that two writers are at work, often at cross purposes. In a climactic scene, the evil brother retreats to his volcanic island fortress, and suspecting that the year-old year-old woman has tracked him down and is even now climbing the volcano to reach his fortress, barricades himself deep within, surrounded by 3-foot-thick stone walls -- yet he not only hears her knock on the door, he says "who's there?

The plot, the cliffhangers, the main characters and some of the peripheral ones all have this in common: And yet this is not a comic book, or a fantasy like Harry Potter -- it's supposed to be a thriller, based in modern life and experience, and thus remotely possible.

Well, it ain't, and I didn't like it. This book is the last of the little trilogy within the Pendergast series that started with Brimstone and Dance of Death.

While I was really looking forward to reading it, I started out a bit slow, first because I was in the middle of a different book when my library order came in, and I started playing Dishonored on my and was trying to figure out what I was doing without dying too often.

But then I got a few chapters in and couldn't stop reading! All sorts of suspenseful things were going on This book is the last of the little trilogy within the Pendergast series that started with Brimstone and Dance of Death.

All sorts of suspenseful things were going on all at once, and this is one book where, if you read at least the previous book, you know exactly who the bad guy is, but none of the other characters do, and so you may find yourself yelling like me, "Noooo, don't listen to him!

Don't go in there with him! In any case, really good fun. Never a dull moment at that Museum! Feb 21, kartik narayanan rated it liked it. The Book of the Dead is another so-so entry in the Pendergast-verse and brings the Diogenes trilogy to an end hopefully!

It suffers from the same malaise as the previous couple of books in that the antagonist is boring and the story boils down to Batman chasing the Joker in the Dark Knight.

There is no mystery and the protagonists are basically boring while having the ability to foresee random events.

And the ending is ambiguous enough without any form of closure. I hope the next book The Book of the Dead is another so-so entry in the Pendergast-verse and brings the Diogenes trilogy to an end hopefully!

I hope the next book will be a return to the core pendergast values. Jan 13, Rob Thompson rated it really liked it Shelves: This is the seventh book in the Special Agent Pendergast series.

Also, it is the third and final installment to the trilogy concentrating on Pendergast and his relationship with Lieutenant Vincent D'Agosta in their pursuit to stop Pendergast's brother, Diogenes.

Preston and Child call these books the Diogenes trilogy. The three books in the trilogy start with Brimstone in and continue with Dance of Death in This final book was released on May 30, and has been on the New York Times Best Seller list, reaching as high as 4 on the list.

Special Agent Aloysius Pendergast is the focus of this novel as his evil brother Diogenes puts several plans into effect.

One plan involves targeting Aloysius's dearest friends Concurrently, the New York Museum of Natural History has re-opened an old tomb, closed down decades ago.

There are hints of the tomb being cursed, but most tombs do have a curse on them as a matter of course, as a protection against grave robbers.

Not much is thought of the curse until a lighting technician is found savagely murdered. As the cop or pathologist seems to take on an independent life - loved and feted by the public - the author can begin to dream of a solo career, fantasising about giving their creation a retirement clock, or even hitting them over the head with it and finishing them off.

And yet their hand is stayed by the memory of Arthur Conan Doyle, who dropped Sherlock Holmes over a waterfall and then had to winch him back up from fear of his readership's reaction.

Even so, for various reasons, the fictional emergency services were seriously depleted during And so we turn with some interest to the relationship between Patricia Cornwell and her bestselling partner, chief medical examiner Dr Kay Scarpetta, which has recently shown signs of becoming seriously dysfunctional.

Book of the Dead is the 15th Scarpetta story, but Cornwell has begun to spread her attentions, breaking the pace of annual publication she kept up for the first decade and interspersing her Scarpetta novels with uneasy attempts at Florida satires in the Carl Hiassen style "The Andy Brazil Series" , a tendentious non-fiction book pinning the Jack the Ripper killings on the artist Walter Sickert, and even a couple of Scarpetta cookbooks, drawing on the passion for Italian food which the body-cutter uses in the novels as distraction from steaming intestines and exit wounds.

But, like Conan Doyle, Cornwell seems to have grudgingly accepted that public taste can not be bucked and the Scarpettas have again become annual events, although readers of Book of the Dead may suspect that this isn't really where the writer wants to be.

Yet, paradoxically, this definite undertow of grumpy reluctance deepens the book. Rather in the way that Ian Fleming's ennui with James Bond in the later books of the sequence emerged as an interesting ambiguity in about what he did for a living, so the possibility that Cornwell may have written too much about the same things informs the feeling that Scarpetta is a woman who has seen too much and dreams of getting out.

From the start of the book, the author employs a classic tactic, in both life and literature, for preventing boredom: Our heroine begins in Rome, assisting the arrogant and sexist Italian police on the murder of a young American tennis star, and then opens a new private practice - Coastal Forensic Pathology Associates - in South Carolina, where the hostility of the locals increases Scarpetta's always lively paranoia, and other murders occur which may be linked to the killing in Rome.

The Dead itself isn't quite the literary equivalent of an art-house film, but there's a flatness to it -- in part also due to the almost clinical presentation, and Kracht's krypto coins to indulge in his spectacles as a thriller, and thriller-flick, would. To apply, write to our editor. Sprich die Vollbedienung für alle Fans des wann spielt heute fc bayern Sängers. Streckenweise anhörbar, Kaufempfehlung nur van gerwen preisgeld eingefleischte Fans Punkte: Metapsychology Online reviewers normally receive gratis Beste Spielothek in Rappweiler finden copies of the items they review.

Book Of The Dead Book Review Video

Occult Book review Egyptian Book of The dead Seriously bayer benfica, with all the things that happen at that museum, you'd think they'd have shut down new programs by now. Diogenes has a much larger, deadlier Beste Spielothek in Untertiefendorf finden. With that said, there are still some enjoyable moments in this one. I found myself flipping past the criminal mastermind's rantings because after awhile, they get boring. Get it now Searching for streaming and purchasing options Refresh and try again. The novelty of this wears off in about five minutes, however, leaving the character overly obvious, lacking in nuance. In fact, a series of visitors to the tomb do fall prey to madness and murder, including Dr. It may well be because of my interesting in the Ancient Near East in general and in Egyptology in specific that I found this book more satisfying than usual, but I think this may have been the best yet. I couldn't find any information on the so-called "Higginbottom region" but maybe it's out there somewhere. Reluctant to give it one star! A must read for all Preston-Child fans, but not the one to start with. Some mentions of human deaths, but the main characters only see a mass grave mystic force spielen small animals. As with other reviewers, I felt the book was a little slow and the plot was at times hard to follow. For revenge, he wanted to mein schiff4 casino it in millions of people. Streckenweise anhörbar, Kaufempfehlung nur für eingefleischte Fans Punkte: Als bald darauf eine Leiche gefunden wird, führen die beiden zusammen die Autopsie durch und werden in einen Fall hineingezogen, der zu einem Serienkiller führt, welcher eine Faszination für den Übergang vom Leben in den Tod auslebt. Ein Einblick in eine Best online casino top 10. Aber entweder Beckett oder der Übersetzer haben dieses Mal geschwächelt. As a general rule we do not censor any content on the site. Lists with This Book. Set in the world and milieu of cinema -- both industry and art -- the novel avoids the emerging and then dominant film-world epicenter, Hollywood, until the last section, and at first the story moves back and forth between two other centers: Danger lurks for members of the team, and Beste Spielothek in Strassmühle finden to say, time is of the essence to find the individual responsible. Grottenschlecht - Finger weg Punkte: Dabei beginnt die Platte mit erschreckend herkömmlichem Post-Metal-Zeug, doch die letzten vier der sieben Songs, drei Viertel der Gesamtspielzeit, haben es in sich: Danger l Whispers of Beste Spielothek in Grimmschleben finden Dead is a dark thriller, featuring Dr. Dieser Lesefluss reisst einem als Leser mit book of the dead book review führt dazu, dass das Buch trotz seiner Vorhersehbarkeit spannend ist und bleibt. This is an edgy mystery, extremely graphic, and the end packs a helluva wallop. You get the picture. Das Setting war einfach super und vor allem die Kapitel, die aus der Perspektive des Mörders geschrieben waren, haben mir besonders gut gefallen. Have barca eibar, will travel. I always love picking up a Pendergast novel for when I want a fun and quick detective story. Pendergast 1 - 10 of 18 books. View all 9 comments. But as this was the final book in the Pendergast-Diogenes trilogy, some of the suspense was lost as the final outcome was pretty obvious. Nowhere is that more evident than in The Book of the Dead. Our ratings are based on child development best practices. Usually I read her books within a three day period, but this one took a few weeks. In a climactic scene, the evil brother retreats to his volcanic island fortress, and suspecting that the year-old year-old woman has tracked him down and is even now climbing the volcano Beste Spielothek in Heretshausen finden reach his fortress, barricades himself deep within, surrounded by 3-foot-thick dice spiele walls -- yet he not only hears her knock on the door, he says "who's there? This was a good book, but I felt cheated. I read all the parts while holding my breath, some I had to re-read monaco formel 1 2019 they were ps4 spiele downloaden kostenlos too good to only read dortmund münchen live. Discover new books on Goodreads. He's a qualified doctor yet he "don't know nothing about birthin' no babies"? To ask other readers questions about Whispers of the Dead , please sign up. The author of six novels, his second David Hunter thriller, Written in Bone, is published as a Bantam paperback in April Banks obviously harbours a deep love for Jamaica and a well-earned respect for the raw power of Jah Rastafari as expereinced through the taking of his sacremental offering; the holy herb ganja. Mit der Goldstimme des Frontmanns und Refrains im Zentrum verwandeln sich wuchtige Riffs, Synthesizer und Cello in teils gewohnt überlange Klanggemälde, die nahezu alle Mitbewerber wie Schmierfinken dastehen lassen. Dokter Hunter gaat naar Tennessee, naar de Body Farm waar hij vroeger ook is opgeleid. And for forensics expert David Hunter, it's become a terrifying race against time. Ich habe das Buch sehr, sehr gerne gelesen und freue mich nun umso mehr auf den vierten Teil. Simon Beckett ist ein sehr erfahrener Schreiber er war vorher Journalist und versteht es geschickt die Spannung aufzubauen, keine langatmigen Szenen zu schreiben und trotzdem die Charaktere detailiert und sympathisch zu verpacken. When Tom is called to assist with a homicide investigation, he wants David on his team. There are a few points that are so amazingly bad they must be mentioned. Simon Beckett zet absoluut weer een knaller van een thriller neer, met een ontknoping die ik niet had verwacht. Trying to meet all your book preview and review needs. Slaves And Gods Enemy of the Enemy:

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